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Research Project – Trauma and the Altered Self

Research Project – Trauma and the Altered Self

Dr. Ida Kaplan and Evan Jureidini are urgently seeking participants (mental health professionals) for a research study investigating an important and under researched area of posttraumatic mental health – experiences of self or identity following significant trauma in adulthood.

We would like to invite mental health professionals who have:

  • Experience working therapeutically with clients who have a history of exposure to significant trauma in adulthood.

Interview with Professor Kelsey Hegarty on the barriers and solutions for disclosure of domestic violence.

(Originally published in Stress Points 2016)

Professor Kelsey Hegarty is an academic general practitioner who works in the Department of General Practice at the University of Melbourne. She currently leads a research program on abuse and violence in primary care. Her current research includes the evidence base for interventions to prevent violence against women;

An interview with Professor Richard Tedeschi on posttraumatic growth

(originally published in Stress Points, December, 2015)

  1. Given that most research and practice regarding trauma focuses on alleviating symptoms of PTSD, depression, anxiety and so on, what led you to develop your approach and the subsequent model of PTG?

If we go back to the beginning, [mid 80’s], my colleague Lawrence Calhoun and I were looking at the concept of wisdom.

The 15th European Society for Traumatic Stress Studies Conference June 2-4, 2017

The National Centre for Psychotraumatology and the University of Southern Denmark are presenting the 15th ESTSS conference “Child Maltreatment Across the Lifespan”. The conference will take place on 2-4 June 2017 in Odense, Denmark.

The conference will focus on a range of traumatic responses that are inclusive of a number of different survivor groups e.g.,

“I was five when I was kidnapped’: The Baulkham Hills African Ladies Troupe Documentary review by The Guardian.

The Baulkham Hills African Ladies Troupe begins with a close-up of a soulful-looking African woman in a pink singlet. She’s in front of a blue projected background simulating rain, touching her face. Her eyes are closed and her hands are wet. Small streaks of water trickle down her arms as her voiceover begins: “I love my neck … ”

Whatever beauty that moment has turns devastating in a heartbeat.